Compound angles and complex curves

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Yesterday we divided our time between preparing the marine ply for mounting, and constructing the stern post. This has to be perfectly straight and solid to hold the curve of the ply when we mount the sides in place.

Ian put together an ingenious tailor-made soaking bath to soften the ply. The resin itself is (we hope) fully waterproof, but the fibres should soften with soaking, allowing us to bend the ply more easily into place, and then set again in their new positions to form a strong curve.


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These angles were tricky to do but we now have a stern that looks like it could break Ice. Hopefuly robust enough to withstand some hard knocks in its life as a resource for young people and community activities in the future.


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Now that it has a stem the boat is starting to transform from ‘primordial fossil space fish’ to something more like a viking longship (in miniature). The origins of the flatner design are lost in time, but it is thought to owe its shape to either Viking or Saxon heritage… what do you think?

Boat glue

You know those moments of doubt? When you wonder whether art can ever really be relevant to environmental and social issues, when you know it’s not exactly going to save the earth?

Well. Apparently we have the answer. Gorilla glue can fix it all:

gorila glue

Today’s jobs were what it says on the tin – tough, but effective. The whole base of the boat is now glued, clamped and screwed, and curing overnight ready for cutting out tomorrow.

working together

Thankfully our work was punctuated by visits from a couple of old and new friends – our boat now has the approval of an experienced sea captain. And as if to remind us what the whole thing is about, ‘Planet Earth’ put on a spectacular sunset display to round off a cold but beautiful and productive day.

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A generous gift

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After a long, slow journey – late buses, hail storms, missed connections and all – it was lovely to have such a warm welcome back to Langport.

Some:when has been made possible by a great deal of creative and generous input and support from people locally, who’ve contributed in so many ways. It was good to be able to add to this list the support of Travis Perkins, who generously agreed to sponsor us with a donation of materials and equipment for the boat. We’d like to say a big thank you to the management of the Langport branch of Travis Perkins, who so kindly arranged the sponsorship, and helped make sure we had all we needed.

It’s exciting to have all the materials, tools and workshop set up and ready to go. Thanks to all who helped today, and on the project so far!

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Pal·imp·sest

Last week at the LitterARTi exhibition in Bristol Jethro ran a workshop for children with designer-maker Fiona Hobson – creating laminated collages with children, from waste plastic bags and sweet wrappers (Seila was running a willow sculpture workshop with the artist Sarah Edwards outside)

It was a great chance to experiment with techniques we also hope to use for the some:when sail/banner. It was great to see how tough the laminate is and to get a sense for the properties of the materials, colours and textures – which were far too much for my phone’s camera to handle:

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This was actually our second attempt – our first was an impromptu living-room experiment with Claire and her incredible collection of creative scrap, at Bow Wharf in Langport. There are few relevant artists to consider if we talk about working with lamination and layering. Anselm Kiefer is one of them, one of the main artists working with the palimpsest technique to generate his work.

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Anselm Kiefer

pal·imp·sest (plmp-sstn. 

1. A manuscript, typically of papyrus or parchment, that has been written on more than once, with the earlier writing incompletely erased and often legible.

2. An object, place, or area that reflects its history.
Henrique Oliveira

Henrique Oliveira

And the incredible Museo Aero Solar, a hot air balloon made from laminated waste plastic bags:

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Museo Aero Solar